pink diamondJennifer Lopez’s legendary 6.1 carat pink diamond engagement ring brought a great deal of attention to the world’s most sought-after and expensive colored diamond. Pink diamonds are incredibly beautiful, unique and scarce. With all of these qualities, these naturally colored stones cost a premium price and are considered to be highly elite. For instance, the most expensive diamond in the world was sold at an auction to British billionaire Laurence Graff. The specs on this pink diamond? An enormous 24.78 carat stone totaling $47.3 million dollars. Where are Pink Diamonds Found? Traditionally, white diamonds were believed to be the most appealing types of stones. However, this all changed when the Argyle Diamond Mine in Australia began discovering pink diamonds. Today about 95% of all pink diamonds are mined in the Argyle Diamond Mines. However, out of all of these diamonds, only an incredibly small amount are graded as pink diamonds—perhaps less than one tenth of a percent. In other words, for every million carats mined, only one carat would be available for sale. This really puts the rarity of a natural fancy pink diamond into perspective.   Where Does the Pink Diamond Get its Amazing Color? There is much speculation as to where a pink diamond gets its color from and although its origins are continually debated, many experts agree that this is precisely why a pink diamond is so fascinating. Some believe that the pink color is a result of tremendous pressure which causes the diamond to rise closer to the surface of the Earth. The structure of the diamond is then changed, allowing light to be absorbed and creating a pink color in the stone. There is simply no other stone like it in terms of color intensity and radiance, making it a coveted gem by celebrities, gemologists and collectors alike. How Do I Buy a Pink Diamond?

As pink diamonds are so rare and expensive, they pose some unique buying considerations, such as:

1. Intensity. A pink diamond has varying shades of intensity, from a subtle light rose to rich cherry and dramatic reddish-purples. The price of each carat depends on how rich and deep the color of the diamond. The nearer a pink diamond’s color is to red, the greater its rarity and therefore more expensive. 2. Weight. The carat weight also determines the price of a pink diamond, just as with white diamonds. The prices are substantially different and one needs to be prepared to pay approximately 20 times the price per carat as a regular white diamond. 3. Color Modifiers. Many diamonds will generally appear naturally with a dominant color and a secondary color, also known as a color modifier. There is a price difference based on the secondary colors (modifiers) found in the stone. For instance, a diamond with the grading “Purplish-Pink” will generally cost less than a diamond graded as “Pink” without any secondary coloring. A color modifier marginally lessons the price of the diamond. The good news? Pink diamonds with a secondary color or hue are more affordable for average buyers and stunning in their own right. Some of the world’s most incredible diamonds are the pink diamonds and although more expensive and rare, they offer an incredibly unique gemstone to any collection. As they are only offered by a limited number of stores, you may want to begin with places such as the Argyle Diamond Mine, Leibish & Co. and Harry Winston.

Argyle Pink Diamonds are rare enough to have their own grading system. The system grades each stone chiefly by color. For instance, on the chart below, a 1pp is an intense purple, with calibrations in color through to 9pp. Colors range from Purplish Pink, to Pink Rose, Pink Champagne and Blue Violet, and Red.

Argyle Pink Diamond Chart

Photos Courtesy of www.argylepinkdiamonds.com.au, www.tiffany.com

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